Dating in islamic culture

For young couples like them, the idea of dating is common, and it means balancing their religious views with their desire for emotional intimacy.But the term “dating” still invites an offensive suggestion for many Muslims, especially older ones, irrespective of how innocent the relationship may be.“People are becoming more open-minded,” says Ammar Ali, 26, an Omani who met his wife Sarah (half-Omani, half-Scottish) through a mutual friend.In a survey of 921 Omanis aged 18 to 60, al-Mahrooqi’s research centre found that 83% were against arranged marriage.“She was mad,” Iqbal, now 18, said in a phone interview.Her mother asked, “Why would you post pictures up of you and him, especially kissing and knowing that the family will find out and see?

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“Somebody with, for example, the same kind of education and background, instead of the same kind of family.” As a result, many are looking for partners at university, at work or on social media.

I am a small, loud, brown lady who writes a comedy blog about love, life, dating and relationships and how this entwines with my cultural and religious identity.

I also write about interfaith marriage and my very lovely, often comedic, life with my husband “Bob”.

I remember hearing an interview on the radio with a Muslim, a few years ago. (In this article I will address only the Christian community.) What is the rationale behind the ruling?

As the interview began, the host asked the Muslim guest whether he was married. The radio host pressed home the point, saying that the guest’s first statement was a little misleading, wasn’t it? Then, if I recall correctly, the radio host sensed his guest’s unease and changed the subject. Beyond any doubt, Islam is patriarchal, so a Muslim man must have final control in the relationship.

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